Deceptions Everywhere ®

Insights on threat and cyber risk trends, use cases for deception technology
and strategies for combatting targeted attacks

Doing Our Part to Narrow the Cyber Talent Gap

Posted by Beth Ruck on Aug 10, 2017 7:00:38 AM

The second and third most common inhibitors to better cyber defense, according to the 2017 Cyberthreat Defense Report are “the shortage of skilled personnel and too much data for IT security teams to analyze.” The two are undoubtedly related.

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SANS Institute on illusive Solution: A Game-Changer

Posted by the Illusive Networks team on Apr 27, 2017 2:48:37 PM

Growing awareness of illusive networks Deceptions Everywhere™ technology recently led SANS Fellow, Dr. Eric Cole, to test our solution. Not only did he aim to successfully deceive an attacker, he also evaluated illusive’s scalability, manageability, and believability. The results of his (unsuccessful) efforts to attack a network and escape detection are contained in a new SANS Product Review - Deception Matters: Slowing the Adversary with illusive networks.

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Timeline Analysis Based on Time Stamped Forensics

Posted by Hadar Yudovich on Feb 2, 2017 2:49:35 PM

Hi Readers,

Welcome back to the second installment of our DFIR blog!  If you didn’t read Introduction to Digital Forensics and Incident Response check it out.  

Let’s get started on our next chapter, Timeline Analysis and Time Stamped Forensics.

A Chapter from Your Favorite Crime Novel

In one of his blog posts, Corey Harrell described timeline analysis as a "great technique to determine the activity that occurred on a system at a certain point in time".  When referring to DFIR, we would take it one step further: timeline analysis is necessary for effective incident response.

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Introduction to Digital Forensics & Incident Response (DFIR)

Posted by Hadar Yudovich on Dec 13, 2016 8:53:42 AM

Practically, conducting digital forensics analysis is the procedure of investigating security alerts or suspicions of malicious activity in a computer network.

I like to think of DFIR as a procedure analogous to a military debriefing.
When fighter pilots return from an operative mission, they immediately conduct a debrief, which covers the objectives, what worked and what didn’t, and exactly how the next mission will be improved upon to complete each objective.  Digital Forensics is really no different and here's why ...

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